Tax Reform

  • The New Qualified Business Income Deduction Under IRC Section 199A

    By:
    Ellen Seiler Brody, Esq., and Vivek A. Chandrasekhar, Esq.
    |
    Apr 1, 2018
    Public Law 115-97 (the Act) provided a significant benefit to corporate taxpayers. While the highest marginal corporate tax rate was previously 35%, corporations now face only a flat 21% tax. In an attempt to provide parity for non-corporate taxpayers, the Act introduces a new IRC section 199A, which provides a 20% deduction for qualified business income earned by individuals, trusts, and estates. 
  • The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: Traps for the Unwary Accountant

    By:
    Ellen Seiler Brody, JD, CPA, Esq. and Vivek A. Chandrasekhar, JD, Esq.
    |
    Feb 1, 2018
    On Dec. 22, 2017, President Trump enacted into law Public Law 115-97, which is colloquially, although not technically, called the "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act" (the "Act").  The Act enacts wide-ranging changes to the IRC, such as lowering the individual and corporate rates, creating a brand new deduction for certain non-corporate business, and increasing expensing for certain capital expenditures.
  • How the 2017 Tax Reform Act Affects Estate Planning for High-Net Worth Individuals

    By:
    Kevin Matz, Esq., CPA, LLM (Taxation)
    |
    Feb 1, 2018
    On Dec. 20, 2017, Congress passed far-reaching changes to the IRC that were signed into law by the president on Dec. 22, 2017 as Public Law 115-97 (the “2017 Tax Reform Act,” also informally known as the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act”).  

  • The Effect of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 on Expatriation

    By:
    Shannon P. McNulty, Esq., LLM (Taxation), CFP
    |
    Feb 1, 2018

    Affluent U.S. citizens and long-term legal permanent residents (i.e., green card holders) looking to expatriate from the United States can face a daunting financial obstacle in the form of the exit tax regime imposed by IRC section 877A. While the recently enacted tax law leaves IRC section 877A unchanged, it effects other changes to the IRC that can make it easier for those seeking to expatriate to get out from under IRC section 877A penalties.

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