Latest Articles

  • Don’t Overlook Your Clients’ IRA Beneficiary Designations

    By:
    Kevin Matz, CPA, Esq., LLM
    |
    Apr 1, 2016
    The beneficiary designation forms for qualified retirement plans and individual retirement accounts (collectively, “IRAs”) are often overlooked in a client’s estate plan. But in many instances, the beneficiary designation forms will control more assets than the will itself. 
  • Carried Interest: Labor vs. Capital

    By:
    Daniel G. Mazzola, CPA, CFA
    |
    Apr 1, 2016
    The U.S. government promotes business activity via the I.R.C. by taxing the profits of the sale of investment assets held for at least one year at a lower rate than the one at which income for services rendered is taxed. 
  • Is It Time For A Flat Tax On Private Foundations?

    By:
    Robert Lyons, CPA, MST
    |
    Apr 1, 2016

    Under our current federal tax structure, private foundations pay a 2% excise tax on their net investment income when filing Form 990-PF.  In certain years, the 2% rate can be reduced to 1% when the foundation’s charitable distributions exceed the average distributions during a five-year averaging process. This is determined on Part V of Form 990-PF. 

  • Colorado Wins Round Two on Use Tax Reporting Requirements for Remote Sellers

    By:
    Brian Gordon, CPA
    |
    Apr 1, 2016
    In 2010, Colorado enacted a law that imposes use tax reporting obligations on many remote sellers with no nexus to the state. This law does not require them to collect sales or use tax; it only requires them to report the sales information to both the purchaser and the state of Colorado, notifying them of a use tax liability. 
  • The 2015 Business Extender Law

    By:
    Stewart Berger, CPA
    |
    Mar 1, 2016
    On Dec. 18, 2015, President Obama signed the “Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015” (PATH Act). Highlights of the law as it pertains to businesses are as follows
  • ‘Til Death or Divorce Do Us Part

    By:
    Carole M. Bass and Rebecca A. Provder
    |
    Mar 1, 2016
    Death and divorce -  two “d” words that no one wants to talk about, but which cannot be ignored. While working together at the same firm, the authors – a trusts and estates lawyer and a matrimonial lawyer – have seen firsthand the significant overlap between their two fields, and how considering both can achieve optimal results for clients. 
  • IC-DISCS 101: The History, Relevance, and Importance of Interest-Charge Domestic International Sales Corporations

    By:
    David Roer, CPA
    |
    Mar 1, 2016
    In a recent heated tax discussion, the topic of Interest-Charge Domestic International Sales Corporations (commonly known as an IC-DISC) was brought up. 
  • You Can’t Take it With You: Passive Activity Loss Carryovers at Death

    By:
    Carl Fiore, JD, LLM
    |
    Mar 1, 2016
    “You can’t take it with you.” Although more commonly associated with gift and estate tax planning among tax practitioners, this statement also applies to income tax as well. 
  • Examining the Nuances of New York Income Taxation of Trusts

    By:
    Catherine B. Eberl, JD
    |
    Feb 1, 2016
    Just like a resident individual, a New York resident trust is subject to New York income tax on all of its income. 
  • Social Security Strategies

    By:
    Daniel Mazzola, CPA, CFA
    |
    Feb 1, 2016
    The Social Security Act, was signed into law in 1935, was designed to provide adequate financial assistance to the elderly, the poor, the unemployed, the widowed, and fatherless children.  

Tax Quote

“This is the season of the year when we discover that we owe most of our success to Uncle Sam.” 


- The Wall Street Journal

Death, taxes and childbirth! There's never any convenient time for any of them.
*Outside the Box is a new addition to the TaxStringer featuring important articles on financial and investment management topics by top authors who have expertise both inside and outside the realm of taxation.

 

 

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