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NextGen Magazine

 
 

  • NYC Millennials Breaking Budgets on Housing Costs

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 20, 2018
    A survey of over 1,000 renters and homeowners across New York City has found that, while a sizable chunk of city dwellers spend more on housing than what they initially budgeted for, millennials are the most over-extended in terms of keeping a roof over their heads. 
  • When Small Talk Runs Out

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 16, 2018
    You're talking to someone at a networking event and have reached the stage in the conversation where you've exhausted all the regular small talk topics at your disposal. Now you're both kinda shuffling around awkwardly as you scope out the room for someone to save you from this situation. But perhaps you can salvage this talk? 
  • Graduating Students Now Face Average of $37,172 Debt Load

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 15, 2018
    The average student debt load for new graduates is now $37,172, a dramatic increase of $20,000 over the past 13 years. 
  • Americans Will Spend an Estimated $19B on Valentines Day

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 14, 2018
    Valentines Day is a big deal in the U.S. if spending figures are any indication: it's estimates that Americans will spend $19.6 billion on the holiday.
  • Study: Pretty Much No One Reports Cryptocurrency Transactions

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 13, 2018
    Out of the 250,000 people who have already filed their taxes through site CreditKarma, only 100 have reported any transactions involving cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. 
  • So You Want a Promotion...

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 9, 2018
    It's rare that opportunity comes to you. More often, you need to go to it. This means that, rather than waiting for the boss to recognize your talent and promote you, you might want to instead go to to the boss and directly ask. But before you do, Glassdoor.com has a few do's and don'ts to keep in mind. 
  • Why Hours, Not Results, Still Dominate Our Thinking

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 8, 2018
    Why is it that we still use hours as a metric for how hard we're working when we've known for a while that a 16-hour day alone won't produce the results we need? 
  • NYC No. 3 in Highest Credit Card Debt, No. 4 in Biggest Tax Refunds

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 7, 2018
    One study ranks New York City residents as number three when it comes to credit card debt, but at the same time another one places it at number four when it comes to the biggest tax refunds. 
  • Job Interviews While Unemployed Don't Need to be Stressful

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 6, 2018
    While it's true that it's much easier to get a job if you already have one, it's not an ironclad law. A recent CNBC article went over how to explain your current employment status to prospective employers in a way that won't turn them off of you. 
  • Study: Without Strong Digital Culture, Tech Can Sap, Not Enhance, Productivity

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 5, 2018
    A recent study of over 20,000 workers conducted by Microsoft concludes that organizations need a "strong digital culture" to realize productivity gains from technology, else the myriad distractions faced by today's workers, from email notifications to cute cat videos, will actually make things less productive than before. 
  • Amazon Patents Wristband Tracking When Workers Slack Off

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 2, 2018
    Online retail giant Amazon has successfully won two patents for a type of wristband that would allow bosses to monitor every move their workers make and issue feedback remotely. 
  • Dog Qualifies for Unemployment Benefits

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Feb 1, 2018
    While some dogs are working dogs, many others lack gainful employment, such as one from Michigan named Ryder, who, much to the surprise of his person, recently qualified for unemployment benefits equal to $360 a week. 
  • Github Has 1000 Pages Employee Handbook

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Jan 31, 2018
  • Study: Weekend Emails Most Likely to be Opened and Replied To

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Jan 30, 2018
    A study of 300,000 emails has found that your message is most likely to be read and replied to if it was sent over a weekend. 
  • $530M Cryptocurrency Heist Biggest Ever

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Jan 29, 2018
    Hackers raiding a Japanese cryptocurrency exchange walked out with $530 million worth of cryptocurrencies, the biggest such haul ever recorded. 
  • Considering the Tax Implications of the Flying Car

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Jan 26, 2018
    The flying car, the bog standard cliche used to measure the present against our expectations of the future, would carry numerous tax implications. 
  • Study: Entry-Level Tax Accountants Show Diversity Gains, But Top Leadership Remains Largely White and Male

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Jan 25, 2018
    A recent study has found that there is near parity between men and women in terms of entry-level tax accountants, and strong gains in non-white hires too, but these changes are not reflected in firms' top leadership. 
  • Retailers Go Big on Fraud Prevention, Even At Price of False Positives

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Jan 24, 2018
    Retailers have gotten very aware of cybersecurity and fraud detection, even though they know it means they're losing legitimate customers as a result. 
  • SEC Looks Askance at Companies Changing Name to Include "Blockchain"

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Jan 23, 2018
    SEC Commissioner Jay Clayton said in a recent speech that the commission will be paying extra special attention to companies that look like they're trying to cash in on the public's fascination with blockchain technology without any actual experience in the subject.
  • Mental Health Remains Taboo Topic at Work

    By:
    Chris Gaetano
    |
    Jan 22, 2018
    Despite the fact that one in four people will face a mental illness at some point in their lives, an article in the Harvard Business Review talks about how workplaces often times don't take them as seriously as physical ailments, and so are much less accommodating to those managing them.