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Federal Taxation

  • The IRS’s Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program Has Ended—Now What?

    By:
    Christopher M. Ferguson
    |
    Apr 1, 2020

    On Sep. 28, 2018, the IRS’s Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program (OVDP) came to an end; however, offshore tax and reporting noncompliance persists in today’s increasingly global economy. Tax advisors are still helping clients who have been—or continue to be—noncompliant with their offshore tax and reporting obligations. This Q&A addresses some of the common issues that taxpayers and their advisors are dealing with in a post-OVDP world.

  • The SECURE Act Changes Rules for Individual Retirement Savings Accounts

    By:
    Mark H. Levin, CPA, MS (taxation)
    |
    Feb 1, 2020

    On Dec. 20, 2019, President Trump signed into law the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2020 (FCTA). Among its many provisions, the FCTA includes the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (aka the SECURE Act). While most of these changes affect taxpayers’ IRAs and 401(k) accounts in a positive way, certain provisions tighten some rules. This discussion will review key provisions of the act and their impact on taxpayers.

  • New York City Taxes: A Quick Primer for Businesses

    By:
    Debra S. Herman and Elizabeth Pascal, JD
    |
    Feb 1, 2020

    In addition to the plethora of New York State (NYS) taxes imposed on residents and businesses, New York City (NYC or city) has its own distinct set of business taxes, administered and collected by the NYC Department of Finance (DOF). The DOF collects more than $33.2 billion in revenue for the city and values more than 1 million properties with a total market value of $988 billion.

  • Inside the Black Box: Executors’ Elections

    By:
    Theresa McGinley, JD, Kevin Duncan, JD, and Brian Conboy, JD
    |
    Jan 1, 2020

    During the administration of a decedent’s estate, an executor performs four basic functions: identifies and collects the decedent’s assets; determines cash needs for payment of expenses and debts, and raises cash to pay the expenses; files any required tax returns, including the decedent’s final personal income tax returns, gift tax returns, estate tax returns, and fiduciary income tax returns, and pays associated taxes; and distributes assets in accordance with the terms of the decedent’s Last Will and Testament.

  • A Review of Two Key Provisions of the Taxpayer First Act

    By:
    Frank G. Colella, Esq, LLM, CPA
    |
    Dec 1, 2019
    The Taxpayer First Act (TFA), signed into law on July 1, 2019, established the new IRS Independent Office of Appeals. While most of the new provisions simply formalized current Appeals practice and procedure, the TFA specifically codified [in the new IRC section 7803(e)] the right to an IRS appeal when a taxpayer has received a statutory notice of deficiency, commonly referred to as the 90-day letter.
  • Guidance for Transferees of Partnership Interests

    By:
    Christine Piar, Managing Director of Deloitte Tax, LLP, Copyright © 2019 Deloitte Development LLC
    |
    Nov 1, 2019
    On May 7, 2019, the IRS and the U.S. Treasury department released Proposed Regulations under IRC section 1446(f) that potentially have broad application to the transfer of any partnership interest. It’s important that transferees understand in what manner and to what extent the withholding provisions could apply to them, as well as the potential consequences of noncompliance. This article focuses specifically on the effect of these regulations on the transferee of nonpublicly traded partnership interests, even when withholding does not apply.
  • Taxation of Carried Interests for Senior-Level Fund Managers

    By:
    Arthur H. Kohn, Andrew L. Oringer, and Steven W. Rabitz
    |
    Oct 1, 2019
    Carried interest arrangements have been common for years in many types of private investment funds (“Funds”), including private equity, real estate, and hedge funds. Going back a few decades, the tax analysis applicable to carried interests was highly uncertain. 
 

 
Views expressed in articles published in Tax Stringer are the authors' only and are not to be attributed to the publication, its editors, the NYSSCPA or FAE, or their directors, officers, or employees, unless expressly so stated. Articles contain information believed by the authors to be accurate, but the publisher, editors and authors are not engaged in redering legal, accounting or other professional services. If specific professional advice or assistance is required, the services of a competent professional should be sought.