Federal Taxation

  • Is That Loss Actually Deductible On Your Cannabis Investment or Loan?

    By:
    Peter Metz, CPA, and John Pellitteri, CPA
    |
    Jun 1, 2018

    At the federal level, cannabis businesses that “touch the leaf” are taxed on the sum of revenue less cost of goods sold, according to IRC section 280E. Businesses that do not touch the leaf—meaning those that indirectly benefit from cannabis activity, such as suppliers and landlords—can also claim other deductions. But if there is a loss on your investment or loan, will the loss be deductible? Although the investment might appear rosy right now, storm clouds could one day come to this industry. 

  • Taking Full Advantage of the R&D Tax Credit: Tips for Identifying, Gathering, and Documenting a Sustainable Claim

    By:
    Peter J. Scalise
    |
    May 1, 2018
    In 1981, the U.S. economy was in a recession, and research-and-development jobs were declining throughout the country. In response, Congress passed the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981, which included the Research and Development Tax Credit Program (hereinafter “RTCP” or “RTC”), enacted into the IRC. 

  • The New Qualified Business Income Deduction Under IRC Section 199A

    By:
    Ellen Seiler Brody, Esq., and Vivek A. Chandrasekhar, Esq.
    |
    Apr 1, 2018
    Public Law 115-97 (the Act) provided a significant benefit to corporate taxpayers. While the highest marginal corporate tax rate was previously 35%, corporations now face only a flat 21% tax. In an attempt to provide parity for non-corporate taxpayers, the Act introduces a new IRC section 199A, which provides a 20% deduction for qualified business income earned by individuals, trusts, and estates. 
  • Relationship Capital: How to Evaluate Personal Goodwill Prior to Selling a Closely-Held Business

    By:
    Ladidas Lumpkins, CPA, JD, LLM (Taxation) and Roman Katz, JD
    |
    Mar 1, 2018
    How do you evaluate the financial power of relationships? An iconic scene from the movie The Devil Wears Prada offers great insight, particularly when powerful fashion editor Miranda Priestly recounts how she persuaded the magazine’s publisher to pass over a younger challenger for the job.
  • Understanding Unrelated Business Income Tax

    By:
    Israel Tannenbaum
    |
    Mar 1, 2018

    Facing increased competition for donor dollars and a growing charitable base, many tax-exempt organizations have set their sights on income diversification. As part of this quest for alternative revenue streams, non-profits are expanding into businesses traditionally dominated by taxable entities.  While this can be a boon to an organization’s resources, it can potentially subject tax-exempt entities to reporting and paying taxes, the most common of which is the tax on unrelated business income. 

  • The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: Traps for the Unwary Accountant

    By:
    Ellen Seiler Brody, JD, CPA, Esq. and Vivek A. Chandrasekhar, JD, Esq.
    |
    Feb 1, 2018
    On Dec. 22, 2017, President Trump enacted into law Public Law 115-97, which is colloquially, although not technically, called the "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act" (the "Act").  The Act enacts wide-ranging changes to the IRC, such as lowering the individual and corporate rates, creating a brand new deduction for certain non-corporate business, and increasing expensing for certain capital expenditures.
  • How the 2017 Tax Reform Act Affects Estate Planning for High-Net Worth Individuals

    By:
    Kevin Matz, Esq., CPA, LLM (Taxation)
    |
    Feb 1, 2018
    On Dec. 20, 2017, Congress passed far-reaching changes to the IRC that were signed into law by the president on Dec. 22, 2017 as Public Law 115-97 (the “2017 Tax Reform Act,” also informally known as the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act”).  

 

 
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